Pages Navigation Menu

Most Recent Articles

Things you Can’t Take With you During Change: Your Comfort Zone

Posted by in Organizational Change | 0 comments

Ruts are comfortable. We dig them and furnish them and though we may not be exactly happy there, we feel safe. Leaving our ruts requires a total paradigm shift: climbing and grappling, and we don’t really know what we’ll find once we’re back out in the light of day. Our comfort zones at work are perhaps the ones we cling to the most. After all, lives outside of work change – we buy a house, or get married, get divorced, have a car accident, watch children grow much too fast … work is something that, while it may not be exciting, at least it is a known quantity.

Read More

The Emotional Work of Change

Posted by in Organizational Change | 0 comments

Why is change so hard? Even when we desperately want change, when it finally happens, we can feel afraid or depressed. Happy change is no different. Think of all the big life changes we go through: a wedding day, the day a child is born, graduation … These are all paradigm shifts – happy ones to be sure – and yet the range of emotions on these days of change is wide. We may be laughing one minute and crying the next.

Change at work may be different in scale, but not in substance. Suppose a structural reorganization takes place at work. We may be placed in a new group of co-workers – some of whom we like and others that we don’t like. The group we’re leaving is probably much the same way. So why does a part of us want to hold on to what we had, even as imperfect as it was? Even when changes are anticipated and desired, employee motivation can lag.
During these times, management communication is more important than ever. It is easy for someone entering a new work situation to feel abandoned during a time of change. Their old routine is gone, and they may have moved their office as well. They’re unsure exactly what to do next. This is when leadership development demands that team leaders, managers, and others who are leading the changes at work are available and open. If they are open, accessible, and active in the transition, they will be seen as engaged and not aloof and set apart from the team.

Leaders are also dealing with their own emotions during periods of change at work. By engaging with team members new and old, they not only show that they are integral to the team, but that they, too are going through many of the same emotions that other team members are experiencing.

Visit us at www.HollandResource.com for more resources that help you make your vision a reality.

Read More

Urgency: Is it False or Real?

Posted by in Organizational Change | 0 comments

False urgency at work is a bit like a sugar rush: it may feel good while it’s happening, but the crash afterwards can leave you groggy and dazed. As a team leader, you must communicate true urgency with your team members. True urgency is understanding the reasons behind changes at work, and when communicated properly, it improves employee motivation.

False urgency, on the other hand, is a way of over-dramatizing a situation in hopes of getting a rush of activity and accomplishing a lot in a short period of time. It is a “hurry up and wait” approach that can easily leave team members burned out and cynical. It makes it that much harder for employees to believe a situation of true urgency should a real one come up.

The key to avoiding this is, as you might have guessed, communication. You don’t have to speculate, and you shouldn’t hint to team members that there’s a lot going on behind the scenes that they can’t be made aware of yet (even if it’s true). Sharing the truth with team members will increase their respect for you, and sharing that there are things that you don’t yet know will improve your integrity in their eyes.

Spreading a sense of false urgency, or denying that any change is imminent will result in one thing: a sense of complacency, and teams that are mired in complacency don’t undergo changes well. Effective leadership development requires that you lead by example, because team members often take their emotional cues from team leaders.

If you seem worried, distracted, or remote, they will pick up on it instantly. If you talk frankly about what is going on and show that you are committed to continuing to do your best work in times of uncertainty or change, you will inspire the same in your team members. Management communication includes talking the talk and walking it too.

Visit us at www.HollandResource.com for more resources that help you make your vision a reality.

Read More

The Leader’s Role in Times of Change 

Posted by in Organizational Change | 0 comments

As a team leader, it is important for you to be open to communication throughout the transition period when workplace changes are afoot. You will most likely be called upon to help some team members work through their reservations and hesitations about change. While it is important that you not remain aloof or unavailable to your team members, it is equally as important that you do not try to micromanage your way to successful change.

Successful management communication in times of change involves communicating the vision that’s behind the change and ensuring that employee motivation remains intact during the times of accepting and implementing the little changes that add up to the overall change that the team is undergoing. If you do this, then the team itself should rise to the challenge of responding to challenges inherent in making changes in the workplace.

Leadership development doesn’t mean taking on all the challenges the team faces and taking responsibility for them. It has more to do with showing team members that you have faith in their abilities to meet the challenges that come with change. Encouragement is important, as is acknowledgement that not all team members will be enthusiastic about workplace changes at all times. The enemies of successful change in the workplace include secretiveness, the ordering of changes without explaining the reasoning behind the changes, and dismissing employee concerns.

A paradigm shift can be jarring. Some people embrace change, some people go along, and some people resist change. There’s no way you’ll get every team member to feel the same about change or approach change with the same attitude. But if you are doing your job well as a leader, you can function as the psychological adhesive that keeps the team together and helps its members support each other so that change and transition truly are team functions, and not just forced changes implemented from above.

Visit us at www.HollandResource.com for more resources that help you make your vision a reality.

Read More